Time itself cannot be seen,
but when the remote times in

which gemstones were formed
in considered,
the accumulation of intellect
and technique
that infused
jewelry becomes visible.
Archives
Prologue
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Panthère
Archives
Prologue
  • Prologue
  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Panthère/Archives
  • Prologue
  • Chapter 1
  • Chapter 2
  • Chapter 3
  • Panthère/Archives
PrologueSpace of Time
With light, there is time,
time being division
and accumulation.
Chapter 1Material
Transformation and
Colors
What materials will be used?
What colours will be conveyed?
And regardless of the era,
these continue to be original.
Chapter 2Forms and Designs
In contrast to
the beautiful gemstones and
glittering metals of the earth,
humanity has the blessing of
ideas, design,
and
the challenge of artisanal
technique.
Chapter 3Universal Curiosity
Humanitys curiosity
forces it to travel,
and travel provides
humanity with insights.
Born from this is the miniature
universe of jewelry.
PanthèreA Timeless Symbol
The iconic Cartier image
is the panther.
It has been bonded with
the free independent
woman as she lives
each new era from the past through
to the future
Archives
The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier
Cartier hunted throughout
the world and captured materials.
The curious room in which
this collection of materials is
preserved is an invaluable resource.

2019.10.2wed12.16mon
The National Art Center, Tokyo

Crystallization of Time

Gemstones form over immense periods of time.
After their miraculously discovery,
they are combined in designs based on natural objects
and cultures from throughout the world.
These designs are then realized through
the superb technique of the Cartier jewelers
and create a microcosm of the world.
A dialectic that transcends the space-time of
the globe and culture is formed.
Cartier has held over thirty exhibitions,
the first of which focused on contemporary design,
notably works from the 1970s,
these works being displayed with the Cartier Collection.
Select pieces in private collections scattered
throughout the world and normally unavailable to
the public have also been included.
In some instances,
these works have been displayed to illustrate contrasts,
in other instances, they have been arranged to
illustrate historical progression,
which enhance an understanding of the relationship
between the different pieces.

Exhibition Details

Working from a core concept of “time,” the exhibition explores Cartier’s richly innovative design world in terms of Material Transformation and Colors, Forms and Designs, and Universal Curiosity.
In a world first, this exhibition focuses on the 1970s and later contemporary design works alongside Cartier’s historical pieces from the Cartier Collection.
Hiroshi Sugimoto and Tomoyuki Sakakida of the New Material Research Laboratory (NMRL) have designed novel gallery spaces to encourage new ways of experiencing art. As visitors move through these spaces, ever conscious of the concept of time, they will encounter the NMRL’s fusion of traditional artisanry and cutting edge technology, all evoked in contemporary detailing and finish.
  • Prologue
    Space of Time
    Mystery clocks, called “marvels of horology” are based on a skillful use of optical illusions and light. For the mystery clocks, the two hands of the clock appear to float in the dial as if there were no connection to a mechanism. The movement is hidden within the base or by other surrounding decoration.
    It takes a minimum of several months to complete a mystery clock. They are created thanks to the cooperation of many craftsmen including goldsmiths, enamelers, polishers, and, of course, watchmakers. Although this mysterious complication has now been disclosed, the mystery clock has been made throughout the generations, and continues to be treasured as an art piece.
  • Chapter 1
    Material Transformation and Colors
    In Chapter 1, you will explore how as a jeweler Cartier works with materials, be it metals or stones, using its exceptional savoir-faire in order to create the most innovative designs. For instance, the Maison insisted upon the use of platinum in jewelry as a way of accentuating diamonds. The materials are not limited to gemstones, but on occasion include bird feathers and other organic substances.
    The combinations of gemstones creating vivid and unprecedented strong color contrasts were first introduced to the Cartier repertoire in the early 20th century. In more recent years, a new pursuit of more delicate color combinations has emerged. Cartier’s unique way of combining colors has always been linked to the exploration of new creative approaches to jewelry design.
  • Chapter 2
    Forms and Designs
    In Chapter 2, we present topics regarding the innovation that lies in the essential forms of Cartier jewelry through several key words. For example, we will focus on “Essential Lines” and “Spheres” and analyze the Maison’s long quest for pure lines and forms. We will also look into architectural elements of jewelry design, as well as the way in which movement can be brought into a piece, under the titles “New Architectures” and “Optics.” We will also discover jewelry created from or inspired by accident under the title “Harmony in Chaos”, and how the Maison seeks beauty wherever it might be, in fields considered unrelated to the world of jewelry such as in the world of couture or industry, under the title “Beauty All Around: Industrial and Couture Motifs”.
  • Chapter 3
    Universal Curiosity
    In the last chapter, we introduce “Universal Curiosity” as the origin of Cartier design. Louis Cartier saw the world in bird’s eyes view, and was interested in all cultures and civilizations, putting his energy into accumulating original works of art and literature from around the world. He shared such materials and artworks with his designers and allowed them source of ideas for new creations. Later, this curiosity has continued to be a source of timeless inspiration. We will examine how such immense curiosity for the cultures and native flora and fauna of foreign lands such as Japan, China, India, the Middle East, Egypt, Africa, and Latin America, has led to the creation of innovative designs.
  • Panthère
    A Timeless Symbol
    Since its first appearance as a pattern on a wristwatch in 1914, the ‘panthère’ has become an emblematic motif for Cartier, representing freedom of women in a new era. The supple form of the panther has been passed down from figuration to abstraction, as an ever-changing two-or three-dimensional motif.
    Predatory, sensual, or playful… the panther motif lives through the ages. It represents a multitude of attitudes and gestures, whilst still reflecting the character of the woman who wears it, and has come to be Cartier’s timeless icon.
  • Archives
    The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier
    The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.
    These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.
    While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Cartier Collection
In the 1970s, Cartier made the decision to accumulate a collection that would testify to the Maison’s creative history and to the artistic evolution of its creations. Many valuable creations, including jewelry, timepieces and precious objects, were collected, and in 1983 the Cartier Collection was officially established.
The Cartier Collection now includes pieces from the 1860s through to the 2000s.
These pieces serve not only as an archive of the more than 170 years of Cartier history, but also as a resource that traces the extensive history of the evolution of ornamental art and society from the late 19th century. The breadth and depth of the collection is a reflection of Cartier’s long history of creation.

There are now more than 3,000 items in the collection. As it has grown, the Cartier Collection has attracted the passionate gaze of art museums all over the world. Since the first large-scale exhibition held at the Petit Palais museum in Paris in 1989, selected works from the Cartier Collection have been exhibited at some of the world’s most prominent cultural institutions. They include the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (1997), London’s British Museum (1997-1998), the Moscow Kremlin Museums (2007), the Palace Museum inside the Forbidden City in Beijing (2009, 2019), the Grand Palais in Paris (2013-2014), and the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra (2018).
Cartier Archive
Cartier Archives keep extremely accurate records of each individual work since the creation of the Maison. Each piece is individually documented, and all records from the Maison’s branches in Paris (opened on 13 rue de la Paix in 1899), London (1902), and New York (1909), ledgers, sketches, drawings, and photographic records, have been meticulously catalogued and preserved. Examining these records reveals the commercial activity, including the special orders and the profile of the clients who visited the boutiques in the early days.

Not only do these many resources reveal how pieces came into being, they also make it possible to trace back production processes with great accuracy. Consequently, in the acquisition of new pieces for the Cartier Collection, these resources not only give an understanding of how these pieces were created, they also provide valuable clues about whether or not they are still in their original form. While providing highly detailed information from the past, the Cartier Archives are also an invaluable source of inspiration for Cartier’s creative activities today. Through these archives, a dialogue continues between Cartier’s past and its future.
New Material Research Laboratory
The architectural firm, New Material Research Laboratory (NMRL) was founded by Hiroshi Sugimoto in 2008, together with Tomoyuki Sakakida, partner architect and director of NMRL. In spite of its name, New Material Research Laboratory examines not only common materials and techniques in contemporary architecture, but also those from ancient and medieval times. NMRL then undertakes the challenge of reinterpreting and reimagining the use of these materials in the present. NMRL s goal is to preserve and transmit almost-forgotten techniques, improving upon them so they can be employed in a modern setting. NMRL stands against standardized and superficial construction materials and is dedicated to utilizing traditional materials that require the spirit and skills of true artisans. Hiroshi Sugimoto and Tomoyuki Sakakida excel in working on bold architectural designs that incorporate traditional materials, eschewing current architectural trends.
New Viewing Experience
by The Eugene Studio
dummy
In this exhibition, a dedicated smartphone-type terminal will be distributed to all visitors at the entrance as a device that allows viewers to understand the background and value of each work in a multi-dimensional manner. The Eugene Studio, which plays an active role in the field of contemporary art, was invented for the system of work guidance on this terminal. This corresponds to space and plays a part in the narrative of this exhibition. Visitors can understand the exhibition through their own experiences and awareness through this system and create their meanings. This is a new proposal to think more deeply about the exhibition.
This system removes excessive elements other than works such as wall panel commentary from the field of view, creating an environment where you can concentrate on the beauty of the work itself, and expanding the possibilities of expression where space and work are united is. In addition, by increasing the number of layers of information that cannot be obtained by conventional panel explanations, it will increase the depth of understanding and interest in the exhibition and expand the possibilities of exhibiting works.
This terminal guide with audio that covers the four languages ​​is a new and free viewing experience for as many visitors as possible. Provide
This is an attempt to renew the structure and structure of the exhibition itself, triggered by this exhibition.
This is an attempt to renew the structure and structure of the exhibition itself, triggered by this exhibition.

Outline

Date
2019.10.02
.wed
-12.06
.mon
Closed
Tuesdays
(excepted October 22),
October 23(Wed)
Time
10:00 - 18:00
10:00 - 20:00 on Fri and Sat /
Last admission 30 minutes before closing
Venue
The National Art Center, Tokyo
Special
Exhibition Gallery 2E
Organizers
The National Art Center,
Tokyo / Nikkei Inc.
Special Cooperation
Cartier
Support
Embassy of France
Institut français du Japon
Sponsorship
TAISEI CORPORATION/
YAMAGEN CO.,LTD
Cooperation
Kawashima Selkon Textiles Co., Ltd.
;Utsunomiya City
/
Oya Stone Material Cooperative Union
;GEO NEXUS CO.,LTD
;SALIOT
;THE EUGENE Studio
Exhibition
Design
New Material Research
Laboratory

Ticket

  • General
    Advance
    / Group
  • Adults
    ¥ 1,600
    ¥ 1,400
  • College Students
    ¥ 1,200
    ¥ 1,000
  • High School Students
    ¥ 800
    ¥ 600
  • All prices shown include tax.
  • Group tickets (for groups of a minimum of 20 people) can only be purchased at the National Art Center, Tokyo.
  • Visitors who are junior high school students or younger will be admitted for free.
  • Disabled persons (along with one assistant) will be admitted for free upon presenting the Disabled Person’s Booklet or an equivalent form of government-issued ID.
  • Free entrance to the exhibition for high school students from November 2(Sat.)- 4(Mon.),2019, upon presenting student ID.
  • Advance tickets on sale from July 3 (Wed.) – October 1 (Tue.), 2019. (Sold at the National Art Center, Tokyo only until September 30 (Mon.), 2019).
The National Art Center, Tokyo
Open Days Only
Exhibition Website
Pair Ticket
Details
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Access

The National Art Center, Tokyo
Special Exhibition Gallery 2E
7-22-2 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo
106-8558
  • Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line, Nogizaka Station(C5), direct access from Exit 6
  • Tokyo Metro Hibiya Line & Toei Oedo Subway Line, Roppongi Station(H04&E23), approximately 4-minute walk from Exit 7
  • No parking

Opening Forum
Making of the Exhibition: concept, exhibits, exhibition design

Date
Thursday October 3, 2019
from 14:00-15:30
Venue
Conference Room
at The National Art Center
Language
Japanese & English
(with simultaneous translation)
Admission
free with the Exhibition ticket
(300 seats)
Panel
Ms. Yayoi Motohashi (curator, National Art Center, Tokyo and commissure of this exhibition) Mr. Pierre Rainero (Image, Style and Heritage Director, Cartier) Mr. Tomoyuki Sakakida (Director/Architect, New Material Research Laboratory)
Talk
Contents
  1. Start of the project
    - for an exhibition on design –
  2. About the concept
  3. About the exhibits
  4. About the exhibition design
Traces of Design No01

Mystery Clock

1923
Mystery clocks, called “marvels of horology” are based on a skillful use of optical illusions and light. For the mystery clocks, the two hands of the clock appear to float in the dial as if there were no connection to a mechanism. The movement is hidden within the base or by other surrounding decoration.It takes a minimum of several months to complete a mystery clock. They are created thanks to the cooperation of many craftsmen including goldsmiths,enamelers,polishers, and, of course, watchmakers. Although this mysterious complication has now been disclosed, the mystery clock has been made throughout the generations, and continues to be treasured as an art piece.
Large Portique mystery clock
Cartier Paris, 1923
Yellow gold, platinum, rock crystal, onyx, black enamel, coral, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Marian Gérard, Cartier Collection ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No02

Prism Clock

2016
Mystery clocks, called “marvels of horology” are based on a skillful use of optical illusions and light. For the mystery clocks, the two hands of the clock appear to float in the dial as if there were no connection to a mechanism. The movement is hidden within the base or by other surrounding decoration.It takes a minimum of several months to complete a mystery clock. They are created thanks to the cooperation of many craftsmen including goldsmiths,enamelers,polishers, and, of course, watchmakers. Although this mysterious complication has now been disclosed, the mystery clock has been made throughout the generations, and continues to be treasured as an art piece.
Pocket watch with stand
Cartier, 2016
White gold, steel, sapphire, black translucent enamel (pocket watch),Mysterious double tourbillon complication, Rock crystal, black jade, sterling silver (stand)
Private collection
Amélie Garreau © Cartier
Traces of Design No03

Treasure Pieces

2018
The beginning of each chapter is a display of Japanese antiques with Cartier jewels, which is the highlight of this exhibition. The antiques were selected especially for this exhibition through an aesthetics of Hiroshi Sugimoto, from the New Material Research Laboratory. It is interesting to discover how these two resonate with each other - the unique Japanese aesthetics that have remained for a long historical time, and the refined art of Cartier jewelry deeply rooted in European culture.
Necklace
Cartier, 2018
White gold, 22 baroque-shaped emeralds from Afghanistan totalling 199.02,carats, spinels, garnets, onyx, turquoises, diamonds
FAY CHEUNG collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Traces of Design No04

Material Techniques : Platinum

2014
1906
Cartier Garland style jewelry was first introduced at the very end of the 19th century. Platinum was used to set these elegant designs, which were often presented in the form of tiaras, necklaces, and brooches or stomacher brooches.Originally, silver and gold were used to set stones. However, as soft metals, greater amounts of material is required for their settings, making jewelry look heavy. Moreover, silver also darkens over time. Platinum, on the other hand, is much harder by nature and is more suitable for use on fine and delicate pieces, such as flowered branches, bows, and lace watermarks. Platinum’s pure whiteness and the brilliance of its surface also enhanced the dazzle of diamonds under the electric lamps that were being introduced in the ballrooms at the time.
Necklace
Cartier, 2014
Platinum, one 17.01-carat modified shieldshaped step-cut diamond,diamonds
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Lily stomacher brooch
Cartier Paris, special order, 1906
Platinum, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No05

Stone Techniques : Glyptics

2010
1912
“Glyptic” art is an extremely demanding technique in which hard stones— jade, agate, jasper, quartz, fossilized wood, and more—are engraved. Stones that have slumbered for eons have been awoken and given new forms. The natural colors and patterns are thoroughly examined, after which the carving begins. The unique characteristics of each miraculously uncovered stone become the creative starting point.Today, Cartier takes every effort to ensure this knowledge is passed on to the next generation. It is one of the techniques that supported the extension of design possibilities in jewelry, such as engraving (or use of engraved gemstones which is originally an Indian technique), and bead stringing.
Necklace
Cartier, 2010
Platinum, sculpted petrified wood, brown diamonds, onyx, white cultured pearls, grey cultured pearls, emeralds, diamonds
Private collection
Nils Herrmann © Cartier
Tiara
Cartier Paris, special order, 1912
Platinum, carved rock crystal, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Marian Gérard, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No06

Artisanal Skills and Decorative Techniques :
Hardstone Marquetry

2017
1930
Inlay or “marquetry” is a traditional technique that has for a long time been used for furniture and furnishings in Europe. Cartier utilized the same technique with its exquisite effect to decorate a cigarette case. In recent years, this technique has also been used to decorate watch dials.
Rotonde de Cartier wristwatch
Cartier, 2017
White gold, lapis lazuli, obsidian, agate, cacholong, diamonds, leather strap
Mysterious hour and minute complication
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Cigarette case
Cartier Paris, 1930
Yellow gold, lapis lazuli and turquoise marquetry, lapis lazuli, one sapphire,diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No07

The Cartier
Color Palette :
Tutti Frutti

2016
1936
The Indian tradition of engraving stones to create images of leaves, fruits and flowers inspired the creation of jewelry at Cartier from the 1920s onwards combining carved rubies, sapphires and emeralds. This aesthetic came to be known as Tutti Frutti (literally “all fruits”) after the 1970s.
Necklace
Cartier, 2016
Platinum, white gold, two pear-shaped emeralds from Colombia totalling 60.32carats, emeralds, sapphires, rubies, diamonds
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Hindu necklace
Cartier Paris, special order, 1936, altered in 1963
Platinum, white gold, thirteen briolettecut sapphires totalling 146.9 carats, two leaf-shaped carved sapphires totaling 93.25 carats, emeralds, sapphires, rubies, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No08

Treasure Pieces

2005
On display from Mid October onwards / The beginning of each chapter is a display of Japanese antiques with Cartier jewels, which is the highlight of this exhibition. The antiques were selected especially for this exhibition through an aesthetics of Hiroshi Sugimoto, from the New Material Research Laboratory. It is interesting to discover how these two resonate with each other - the unique Japanese aesthetics that have remained for a long historical time, and the refined art of Cartier jewelry deeply rooted in European culture.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2005
Platinum, one 128.48-carat diamond, diamonds
Private collection
Katel Riou © Cartier
Traces of Design No09

Essential Lines

2018
1902
Cartier aims to enhance the essential through the design. The art of composition lies entirely in the mixing of gems, exactness of proportions and interplay of stone cuts that structures the design, setting a rhythm and freeing the composition’s power of abstraction. The lively movements and rhythms created by jewels can provide certain clues for reinterpretation of natural phenomena, such as the swaying of the water’s surface, or the upward spiral of smoke. In the production of wristwatches, for example, the harmony of form and volume, which is created by the subtle lines of the case, is key for the design.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2018
White gold, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Hair ornament
Cartier Paris, 1902
Platinum, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No10

Spheres

2010
1938
Emblematic of Cartier’s shape repertoire, spheres amplify the volume of a design. Made of colored stones or gold beads, they emphasize the architectural dimension of jewels and reveal an unexpected power of evocation, reminding us of industrial items or delectable berries.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2010
Pink gold, pink opals, onyx, pink sapphires, black sapphires, diamonds
Private collection
Studio Triple V © Cartier
Bracelet
Cartier Paris, 1938
Yellow gold, lapis lazuli
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection ©︎︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No11

New Architecture : Geometric

2017
1932
Cartier designers always take into consideration volume and three-dimensionality, which are important aspects in jewelry design. In fact, the architectural form and details representative of every era have inspired structural elements of Cartier jewelry design. For example, 1920s Art Deco interior decoration design, or the high-rise buildings towering over contemporary urban space. Designs also become architectural structures themselves, actual reduced constructions, marked by the effects of symmetry and parallelism or, on the contrary, by asymmetry, suggesting perspective and movement.
Necklace
Cartier, 2017
Platinum, one 93.81-carat cabochon-cut rubellite, onyx, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Necklace
Cartier London, special order, 1932
Platinum, one 143.23-carat cushionshaped emerald, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No12

Optics (Visual Effects) :
Motion and Kinetics

2014
1903
In its designs, Cartier has often pursued the theme of movement, often asking the question: “How can we release jewelry from its still state, and convey a sense of movement to the viewer?” Cartier responds to this challenge with visual effects borrowed from kinetic art. Designs that skillfully utilize geometric forms, mirror-like structures, and contrasting colors generate optical illusions and impart a sense of movement to the viewer.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2014
Platinum, onyx, one emerald, diamonds
Private collection
Nils Herrmann ©︎ Cartier
Chocker
Cartier Paris, 1903
Platinum, diamonds, moiré
Cartier Collection
Marian Gérard, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No13

Harmony in Chaos : Accident of Design

2015
1967
Even accidents serve as an impetus for Cartier’s creations. Once, a customer brought a watch, that was warped in a car crash, to the Cartier workshop for repairs. Cartier took inspiration from the product of this accident, and in 1967, produced the Crash watch.
Crash Skeleton wristwatch
Cartier, 2015
Platinum, one sapphire, leather strap
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Crash wristwatch
Cartier London, 1967
Yellow gold, pink gold, one sapphire, leather strap
Cartier Collection
Vincent Wulveryck, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No14

Beauty All Around :
Industrial and Couture Motifs

2017
1971
Cartier’s quest for beauty continues even to various objects we might find in our everyday life. The hidden charm in the essence of objects such as nails, screws and pipes or also belt buckles, ribbons and buttons, can also transform into a unique piece of jewelry.
Écrou de Cartier bracelet
Cartier, 2017
Pink gold
Private collection
Tetsuya Niikura © Cartier
Nail bracelet
Cartier New York, 1971
Yellow gold
Cartier Collection
Marian Gérard, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No15

Treasure Pieces

2018
The beginning of each chapter is a display of Japanese antiques with Cartier jewels, which is the highlight of this exhibition. The antiques were selected especially for this exhibition through an aesthetics of Hiroshi Sugimoto, from the New Material Research Laboratory. It is interesting to discover how these two resonate with each other - the unique Japanese aesthetics that have remained for a long historical time, and the refined art of Cartier jewelry deeply rooted in European culture.
Necklace
Cartier, 2018
White gold, two rectangular-shaped morganites totalling 55.18 carats, opals, rubellites, pink sapphires, diamonds
Private collection of David and Leila Centner
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Traces of Design No15

Treasure Pieces

1903
The beginning of each chapter is a display of Japanese antiques with Cartier jewels, which is the highlight of this exhibition. The antiques were selected especially for this exhibition through an aesthetics of Hiroshi Sugimoto, from the New Material Research Laboratory. It is interesting to discover how these two resonate with each other - the unique Japanese aesthetics that have remained for a long historical time, and the refined art of Cartier jewelry deeply rooted in European culture.
Two Fern spray brooches
Cartier Paris, 1903
Platinum, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Vincent Wulveryck, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No16

Culture — Inspirations from Afar : Japan

2018
1925
If you trace the source of inspiration at Cartier, you might travel around the globe. Going beyond borders, it has never stopped exploring age-old diversity and giving it a look that always coincides with the time, all the while ensuring a respectful approach. Japan is one of the countries that has long inspired Cartier. Such as with the “Japonism” craze in art that existed throughout late 19th century in Europe, Cartier also used plum branches in ukiyo-e as motifs for bracelets, or adapted netsuke carvings and other skillfully made handcrafts into designs for vanity cases for women.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2018
White gold, one 14.10 carat cushion-shaped morganite, opal, rubellites, pink sapphires, diamonds
Private collection of David and Leila Centner
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Bracelet
Cartier New York, 1925
Platinum, rubies, emeralds, onyx, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Marian Gérard, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No17

Inspiration from Nature —
From Naturalism to Abstraction :
Flora / Birds / Reptiles / Tiger

2012
1919
Nothing is more mysterious than the animals and plants of the natural world. Cartier has long interpreted nature either realistically or abstractly. Although flowers have been loved by many jewelers, Cartier reinvented the approach to flora – exemplified by its fondness for orchids. Cartier’s colorful jeweled menagerie forms a treasure box of imagination – such as predatory panthers, snakes clinging around the neck, wild graphic tigers… Whatever the design or animal specimen, Cartier expresses the strong character of its creatures, as exemplified by reptiles and big cats.
Necklace
Cartier, 2012
Platinum, one 28.15-carat emerald drop, emeralds, diamonds
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Snake necklace
Cartier Paris, 1919
Platinum, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No18

A Timeless Symbol

2014
Since its first appearance as a pattern on a wristwatch in 1914, the ‘panthère’ has become an emblematic motif for Cartier, representing freedom of women in a new era. The supple form of the panther has been passed down from figuration to abstraction, as an ever-changing two-or three-dimensional motif. Predatory, sensual, or playful… the panther motif lives through the ages. It represents a multitude of attitudes and gestures, whilst still reflecting the character of the woman who wears it, and has come to be Cartier’s timeless icon.
Bracelet
Cartier, 2014
White gold, onyx, one emerald, diamonds
Private collection
Vincent Wulveryck © Cartier
Traces of Design No18

A Timeless Symbol

1949
Since its first appearance as a pattern on a wristwatch in 1914, the ‘panthère’ has become an emblematic motif for Cartier, representing freedom of women in a new era. The supple form of the panther has been passed down from figuration to abstraction, as an ever-changing two-or three-dimensional motif. Predatory, sensual, or playful… the panther motif lives through the ages. It represents a multitude of attitudes and gestures, whilst still reflecting the character of the woman who wears it, and has come to be Cartier’s timeless icon.
Panthère clip brooch
Cartier Paris, 1949
Platinum, white gold, one 152.35-carat cabochon-cut sapphire from Kashmir sapphires, yellow diamonds, diamonds
Cartier Collection
Vincent Wulveryck, Cartier Collection © Cartier
Traces of Design No18

A Timeless Symbol

1914
Since its first appearance as a pattern on a wristwatch in 1914, the ‘panthère’ has become an emblematic motif for Cartier, representing freedom of women in a new era. The supple form of the panther has been passed down from figuration to abstraction, as an ever-changing two-or three-dimensional motif. Predatory, sensual, or playful… the panther motif lives through the ages. It represents a multitude of attitudes and gestures, whilst still reflecting the character of the woman who wears it, and has come to be Cartier’s timeless icon.
Panther-pattern wristwatch
Cartier Paris, 1914
Platinum, pink gold, onyx, diamonds, moiré strap
Cartier Collection
Nils Herrmann, Cartier Collection ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

2014
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Design for a necklace
Cartier Paris, 2014
Gouache, graphite, black ink / tracing paper
Cartier Archives
Cartier Paris Archives ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

2011
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Design for a mystery clock
Cartier Paris, 2011
Gouache, graphite, black ink / grey paper
Cartier Archives
Cartier Paris Archives ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

1930
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Scrapbook
Cartier Paris, circa 1930
Cartier Archives
Cartier Paris Archives ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

1913
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Archives photographs of Jeanne Toussaint and of Count of Quinsonas
during a trip in Massaï district, East Africa
1913
Gelatin silver print
Cartier Archives
Cartier Paris Archives ©︎ Cartier
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

1911
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Mathurin Méheut
Études d’animaux, tome 2
Paris, Librairie centrale des Beaux-Arts
1911
Book
Cartier Archives
Traces of Design No19

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier

1888-1889
The archives section of the exhibition centers on materials collected by Louis Cartier. For example, you can find items such as a catalog from an exhibition of Islamic Art hosted by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, in Paris in 1903.These archives were a veritable “cabinet of curiosities” that characterized Louis Cartier’s worldview. They now exist as a tool that links the past and future of Cartier’s creations. In other words, the past and the future of Cartier are in correspondence with each other.While the books and objects collected by Louis Cartier have been a rich source of inspirations for Cartier designers, drawings show the creative process and intentions behind each design. By looking these archive documents you will find clues to understanding the maison’s inquisitive and pioneering spirit.
Samuel Bing
Le Japon artistique, tome 1(1888-1889)
Paris, Librairie centrale des Beaux-Arts
1888-1889
Book
Cartier Archives
Prologue
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Panthère
Archives
Space of Time
Material
Transformation and
Colors
Forms and Designs
Universal Curiosity
A Timeless Symbol

The Inquisitiveness of Louis Cartier
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